Project

The Guardians

Copyright

Copyright MIT Media Lab

Lea Faske, Delphine Fourneau, Matt Sanz, Karen Teixeira, Craig Ferguson

The Guardians project aims to use the same game design principles used in mobile game platforms to create greater engagement with individuals. The Affective Computing group is developing a custom video game with an independent patient reporting outcome tool to increase adherence to completion of patient reported outcomes.

Forming positive health habits can be difficult. Whether it’s taking medication, sticking to a diet, or going to the gym, it’s tough to commit to a new schedule long enough to form a habit. It is even more difficult when a person is asked to do something regularly that does not directly and immediately benefit them. This is an issue when clinical researchers need study participants to report outcomes regularly over a long period of time. Adherence is lost, resulting in suboptimal clinical outcomes and the loss of important data.

Mobile video games, on the other hand, generate an increased amount of adherence (as seen by an estimated market revenue of over $40.6 billion in 2016**). Mobile video games have captured the attention of a wide variety of demographics and are often targeted … View full description

The Guardians project aims to use the same game design principles used in mobile game platforms to create greater engagement with individuals. The Affective Computing group is developing a custom video game with an independent patient reporting outcome tool to increase adherence to completion of patient reported outcomes.

Forming positive health habits can be difficult. Whether it’s taking medication, sticking to a diet, or going to the gym, it’s tough to commit to a new schedule long enough to form a habit. It is even more difficult when a person is asked to do something regularly that does not directly and immediately benefit them. This is an issue when clinical researchers need study participants to report outcomes regularly over a long period of time. Adherence is lost, resulting in suboptimal clinical outcomes and the loss of important data.

Mobile video games, on the other hand, generate an increased amount of adherence (as seen by an estimated market revenue of over $40.6 billion in 2016**). Mobile video games have captured the attention of a wide variety of demographics and are often targeted to specific subgroups in order to increase engagement with a number of in-game features. These games use common design techniques and mechanics to produce a loop that draws players to return on a regular schedule and encourages them to watch ads, share on social media, or pay a fee for special rewards within the game.

By using the same game design principles, we aim to replace typical video game behaviors, like watching ads or sharing on social, with new behaviors that help improve the player’s wellbeing.

This project is a collaboration between the Affective Computing research group and Media Lab member company Takeda Pharmaceuticals.

**according to research by SuperData Research and Unity Technologies