Brian Mayton

Responsive Environments
  • Research Assistant

Brian Mayton is joined the MIT Media Lab in 2010 and is currently working towards his Ph.D. His research interests include connecting ubiquitous computer technology to the physical world through sensing and actuation, and how networked sensors can change the way we interact with and experience the world around us. He completed his bachelor’s degree in computer engineering with a hardware specialization at the University of Washington in 2008. He spent two years as a research assistant at Intel Labs Seattle where he designed and constructed novel sensors for improving robotic manipulation. After joining the MIT Media Lab in 2010, he explored the use of wearable devices for personalized control of networked buildings. In his current research project, he has networked and instrumented a large outdoor site with wireless sensor nodes to capture and document the transformation as the site is restored from a former cranberry farm to natural wetland. The network, which streams live sensor data, audio, and images to the internet, has potential applications ranging from improving the science of wetland restoration to explo… View full description

Brian Mayton is joined the MIT Media Lab in 2010 and is currently working towards his Ph.D. His research interests include connecting ubiquitous computer technology to the physical world through sensing and actuation, and how networked sensors can change the way we interact with and experience the world around us. He completed his bachelor’s degree in computer engineering with a hardware specialization at the University of Washington in 2008. He spent two years as a research assistant at Intel Labs Seattle where he designed and constructed novel sensors for improving robotic manipulation. After joining the MIT Media Lab in 2010, he explored the use of wearable devices for personalized control of networked buildings. In his current research project, he has networked and instrumented a large outdoor site with wireless sensor nodes to capture and document the transformation as the site is restored from a former cranberry farm to natural wetland. The network, which streams live sensor data, audio, and images to the internet, has potential applications ranging from improving the science of wetland restoration to exploring the ways that people can experience large amounts of sensory information.