Jaya Narain

Fluid Interfaces

I am currently a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering at MIT in the Fluid Interfaces group in the Media Lab.  I am passionate about assistive technology and human centered design.  My research focuses on new augmentative communication interfaces.  I am exploring using personalized machine learning to interpret and translate nonverbal gestures and physiological signals for people with language and speech disorders, particularly for people with nonverbal autism.  I graduated from MIT in  2017 with a SM in mechanical engineering, and in 2015 with a SB in mechanical and ocean engineering.  I have a strong background in computational and analytical modeling, design optimization, and product design.  

I am a co-founder of MIT's ATHack, an assistive technologies hackathon that aims to promote innovation and interest in assistive technologies while building connections between community members and student engineers.  ATHack emphasizes collaborative development—teams of students are matched with a community co-designer who is living with a disability, and work with the co-des… View full description

I am currently a PhD candidate in mechanical engineering at MIT in the Fluid Interfaces group in the Media Lab.  I am passionate about assistive technology and human centered design.  My research focuses on new augmentative communication interfaces.  I am exploring using personalized machine learning to interpret and translate nonverbal gestures and physiological signals for people with language and speech disorders, particularly for people with nonverbal autism.  I graduated from MIT in  2017 with a SM in mechanical engineering, and in 2015 with a SB in mechanical and ocean engineering.  I have a strong background in computational and analytical modeling, design optimization, and product design.  

I am a co-founder of MIT's ATHack, an assistive technologies hackathon that aims to promote innovation and interest in assistive technologies while building connections between community members and student engineers.  ATHack emphasizes collaborative development—teams of students are matched with a community co-designer who is living with a disability, and work with the co-designer from ideation through fabrication and testing.  Since the hackathon began in 2014, we have worked with over 350 student hackers and 85 community co-designers.  

I also enjoy outreach and mentoring.  I have mentored teams in global engineering, design, and toy development classes at MIT, and have been involved in a number of other outreach events on campus for K-12 students.