Nick Obradovich

Scalable Cooperation
  • Research Scientist

Nick Obradovich is a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab in the Scalable Cooperation group, an interdisciplinary lab of social, natural, and computer scientists focused on addressing large-scale cooperation challenges.

He holds a PhD from the University of California, San Diego and completed his postdoctoral training at Harvard University's Belfer Center. He is also the Human-Environmental Systems Fellow at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. In his work, he combines his interests in climate change and human behavior with his affinity for social scientific and computational methods.

Nick's research explores climate change attitudes and the societal impacts of climate change. He has studied climate-related political behaviors, policy attitudes, and rates of adaptation of psychological expectations to gradual changes in climate. He has also examined the potential for climatic changes to alter mental health, mood, physical activity, and sleep as well as rates of democratic turnover and daily governance.

Nick's work regularly appears in top academic journals and in major media outlets including The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.

Nick Obradovich is a research scientist at the MIT Media Lab in the Scalable Cooperation group, an interdisciplinary lab of social, natural, and computer scientists focused on addressing large-scale cooperation challenges.

He holds a PhD from the University of California, San Diego and completed his postdoctoral training at Harvard University's Belfer Center. He is also the Human-Environmental Systems Fellow at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. In his work, he combines his interests in climate change and human behavior with his affinity for social scientific and computational methods.

Nick's research explores climate change attitudes and the societal impacts of climate change. He has studied climate-related political behaviors, policy attitudes, and rates of adaptation of psychological expectations to gradual changes in climate. He has also examined the potential for climatic changes to alter mental health, mood, physical activity, and sleep as well as rates of democratic turnover and daily governance.

Nick's work regularly appears in top academic journals and in major media outlets including The Atlantic, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post.