Project

AttentivU: Towards Improved Wellbeing in the Car

Copyright

Fluid Interfaces group

Caitlin Morris

Groups

Several research projects have recently explored the use of physiological sensors such as electroencephalography (EEG - brain activity) or electrooculography (EOG - eye movements) to measure the engagement and vigilance of a driver. However, these systems still suffer from limitations such as an absence of a socially acceptable form-factor and use of impractical, gel-based electrodes. We have developed AttentivU,  a  device, in the  form factor of a pair of glasses,  which senses brain activity EEG as well EOG to measure different cognitive processes in real time,  including  cognitive load, fatigue, engagement, and focus. The device can be used for passive or active interventions, for example to monitor the state of the user, providing gentle audio or haptic feedback when the user is less attentive or adapting the environment when cognitive overload is detected. The system operates in a standalone, non-networked fashion to ensure privacy of the collected data. 

We have now completed the first test of the glasses prototype with more than 30 subjects who were performing a… View full description

Several research projects have recently explored the use of physiological sensors such as electroencephalography (EEG - brain activity) or electrooculography (EOG - eye movements) to measure the engagement and vigilance of a driver. However, these systems still suffer from limitations such as an absence of a socially acceptable form-factor and use of impractical, gel-based electrodes. We have developed AttentivU,  a  device, in the  form factor of a pair of glasses,  which senses brain activity EEG as well EOG to measure different cognitive processes in real time,  including  cognitive load, fatigue, engagement, and focus. The device can be used for passive or active interventions, for example to monitor the state of the user, providing gentle audio or haptic feedback when the user is less attentive or adapting the environment when cognitive overload is detected. The system operates in a standalone, non-networked fashion to ensure privacy of the collected data. 

We have now completed the first test of the glasses prototype with more than 30 subjects who were performing a driving task in a simulator overnight when they were tired and drowsy, and the system reminded them with a sound or with a vibration to pay attention to the road . This research paper was rewarded with the honorable mention award at the 2019 Auto'UI conference (paper will appear in the end of September 2019). 

Copyright

MIT Media Lab

Copyright

Fluid Interfaces group

Copyright

Fluid Interfaces group

Copyright

Fluid Interfaces group