Project

Holobiont Urbanism: Revealing the Microbiological World of Cities

Groups

This project investigates urban metagenomics to reveal the invisible microbiological worlds within our cities. Using honeybees to gather samples and hives modified to capture "bee debris," the project employs genetic sequencing to discern and visualize urban microbiological neighborhoods and render microbiological landscapes of the city. The Holobiont project was first displayed at the Palazzo Mora in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, with an installation that includes a "metagenomic beehive." Creative, scientific, development and production collaboration with: Ben Berman, Dr. Elizabeth Henaff, Regina Flores Mir, Dr. Chris Mason, Devora Najjar, Tri-Lox, and Chris Woebken, with contributions from Timo Arnall and Jack Schulze and local beekeepers in Brooklyn, Sydney, and Venice.

This project investigates urban metagenomics to reveal the invisible microbiological worlds within our cities. Using honeybees to gather samples and hives modified to capture "bee debris," the project employs genetic sequencing to discern and visualize urban microbiological neighborhoods and render microbiological landscapes of the city. The Holobiont project was first displayed at the Palazzo Mora in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale, with an installation that includes a "metagenomic beehive." Creative, scientific, development and production collaboration with: Ben Berman, Dr. Elizabeth Henaff, Regina Flores Mir, Dr. Chris Mason, Devora Najjar, Tri-Lox, and Chris Woebken, with contributions from Timo Arnall and Jack Schulze and local beekeepers in Brooklyn, Sydney, and Venice.