Project

Ocean Cultures

Devora Najjar

The Māori of Aotearoa (New Zealand) have a long and deep connection to their island and ocean ecosystem. Concepts such as rāhui are traditional methods of ocean protection that long predate modern marine protected areas. Ocean Cultures hopes to support the Mahia Peninsula in generating tools to use for monitoring their ocean surroundings at a time when culturally important fish stocks are being depleted

This will be done through the development of sensing, tracking, and visualization systems that will be co-developed by the Mahia Māori Committee.  These tools will be implemented within the local mātaitai, protected areas of coastal ocean where locals manage all non-commercial fishing, on the Mahia Peninsula. This partnership contributes to the ongoing documentation of the reefs in preparation for a species transplantation program for paua no longer found in the area. Ocean Cultures will additionally support local education efforts that have begun which partner local children with local Māori kaumātua, community elders, to explore the past, present, and future… View full description

The Māori of Aotearoa (New Zealand) have a long and deep connection to their island and ocean ecosystem. Concepts such as rāhui are traditional methods of ocean protection that long predate modern marine protected areas. Ocean Cultures hopes to support the Mahia Peninsula in generating tools to use for monitoring their ocean surroundings at a time when culturally important fish stocks are being depleted

This will be done through the development of sensing, tracking, and visualization systems that will be co-developed by the Mahia Māori Committee.  These tools will be implemented within the local mātaitai, protected areas of coastal ocean where locals manage all non-commercial fishing, on the Mahia Peninsula. This partnership contributes to the ongoing documentation of the reefs in preparation for a species transplantation program for paua no longer found in the area. Ocean Cultures will additionally support local education efforts that have begun which partner local children with local Māori kaumātua, community elders, to explore the past, present, and future of these reefs through kaitiakitanga and local knowledge of the marine ecosystem