Project

Targeted Degradation of SARS-CoV-2 via Computationally-Optimized Peptides

Copyright

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases/NIH

The research described here has been published on a preprint server but has not yet been peer-reviewed by scientific or medical experts.

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has elicited a global health crisis of catastrophic proportions. With no approved cure or vaccine currently available, there is a critical need for effective antiviral strategies. In this study, we report a novel antiviral platform, through computational design of ACE2-derived peptides which both target the viral spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD) and recruit E3 ubiquitin ligases for subsequent intracellular degradation of SARS-CoV-2 in the proteasome. Our engineered peptide fusions demonstrate robust RBD degradation capabilities in human cells, thus prompting their further experimental characterization and therapeutic development.

The research described here has been published on a preprint server but has not yet been peer-reviewed by scientific or medical experts.

The COVID-19 pandemic, caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, has elicited a global health crisis of catastrophic proportions. With no approved cure or vaccine currently available, there is a critical need for effective antiviral strategies. In this study, we report a novel antiviral platform, through computational design of ACE2-derived peptides which both target the viral spike protein receptor binding domain (RBD) and recruit E3 ubiquitin ligases for subsequent intracellular degradation of SARS-CoV-2 in the proteasome. Our engineered peptide fusions demonstrate robust RBD degradation capabilities in human cells, thus prompting their further experimental characterization and therapeutic development.