Alexandra Rieger

Opera of the Future
  • Research Assistant

Alexandra Rieger is a scientist, musician and anti-disciplinary graduate researcher at the MIT Media Lab. Before coming to MIT, she received a Master’s Degree in Neuroscience, Synesthesia Research and Cross-Modal Sound Studies at Dartmouth College, received her Bachelor’s at Stanford University and is an Oxford University Bing Alumna. As a honorary United Nations youth ambassador, her social service work throughout the world (ranging from poverty alleviation, economic development to youth literacy initiatives) and myriad academic experiences, have informed some of the larger questions in her work. She is passionate about promoting neurodiversity and improving upon the human experience by creating pathways between the fields of neuroscience, music, technology and multisensory studies.  Currently she is working on a collaborative initiative to research the effects of specific frequencies in the treatment of Alzheimer's. Her background in the neurosciences and multi-instrumental skills allow her to design and conceptualize a positive sensory experience around this stimuli to support efficacy and encourage patien… View full description

Alexandra Rieger is a scientist, musician and anti-disciplinary graduate researcher at the MIT Media Lab. Before coming to MIT, she received a Master’s Degree in Neuroscience, Synesthesia Research and Cross-Modal Sound Studies at Dartmouth College, received her Bachelor’s at Stanford University and is an Oxford University Bing Alumna. As a honorary United Nations youth ambassador, her social service work throughout the world (ranging from poverty alleviation, economic development to youth literacy initiatives) and myriad academic experiences, have informed some of the larger questions in her work. She is passionate about promoting neurodiversity and improving upon the human experience by creating pathways between the fields of neuroscience, music, technology and multisensory studies.  Currently she is working on a collaborative initiative to research the effects of specific frequencies in the treatment of Alzheimer's. Her background in the neurosciences and multi-instrumental skills allow her to design and conceptualize a positive sensory experience around this stimuli to support efficacy and encourage patient compliance. Her research in this area furthermore contributes aspects of multi-modal gamma stimulation for human-centered applications. Through her work, she seeks to develop and deploy sustainable solutions, assistive technologies and innovations for cognitive pathologies like Alzheimer’s and other challenges facing our communities and world.