Juliana Cherston

Responsive Environments
  • Research Assistant

Link to personal website (Fall 2020: in progress) 

My research interest is in architecting sensor systems for fundamental scientific inquiry. I serve as a bridge between technologists and physical scientists, advancing unconventional ideas from concept studies to prototypes.

I am currently pursuing a PhD in the Responsive Environments Group at the MIT Media Lab. The technical emphasis of my doctoral degree straddles aerospace engineering, distributed sensing, and electronic textile design - I am turning spacecraft thermal blankets into large field-of-view cosmic dust detectors using sensors that can be woven into fabrics. And I'm bringing electronic textile technology to Low Earth Orbit for the first time!

I am also interested in human sensory augmentation. For example, my Master's thesis at the Media Lab (2014-2016) included Quantizer, a platform that enabled artists to map real-time physics data from the ATLAS detector at CERN to musical streams for public listening. For a number of months, it became possible to hear artistically rendered proton and heavy ion collisions in real-time. This project was featured … View full description

Link to personal website (Fall 2020: in progress) 

My research interest is in architecting sensor systems for fundamental scientific inquiry. I serve as a bridge between technologists and physical scientists, advancing unconventional ideas from concept studies to prototypes.

I am currently pursuing a PhD in the Responsive Environments Group at the MIT Media Lab. The technical emphasis of my doctoral degree straddles aerospace engineering, distributed sensing, and electronic textile design - I am turning spacecraft thermal blankets into large field-of-view cosmic dust detectors using sensors that can be woven into fabrics. And I'm bringing electronic textile technology to Low Earth Orbit for the first time!

I am also interested in human sensory augmentation. For example, my Master's thesis at the Media Lab (2014-2016) included Quantizer, a platform that enabled artists to map real-time physics data from the ATLAS detector at CERN to musical streams for public listening. For a number of months, it became possible to hear artistically rendered proton and heavy ion collisions in real-time. This project was featured in Nature Physics Books/ArtPopular ScienceEngadget, and Smithsonian Mag.

Previously, I earned a B.A. in physics at Harvard University with a minor in computer science (2009-2013). I have also completed internships in physics (the ATLAS experiment at CERN), aerospace engineering (Made in SpaceMIT Aero/Astro) and design/innovation (IDEO CoLabMicrosoft).