Cristian Ignacio Jara Figueroa

  • Research Assistant

Cristian is a PhD student and Research Assistant at the City Science group, previously at the Collective Learning group. He holds a bachelor in physics and two master's degrees, one in physics and another in media arts and sciences from the Media Lab. Cristian has participated in a number of academic conferences, corporate board meetings, and policy workshops. 

My research has focused on the geographic diffusion of knowledge.  In particular, I try to understand how regions can leverage the knowledge they have access to, in order to diversify into more productive and more inclusive industries. Recently, I started to focus more on knowledge creation as it relates to innovation and entrepreneurship. In particular, my current research studies the microgeography of innovation.

My past research includes work on uncovering the relationship between the knowledge content of a country's economy and their level of income inequality, as well as work on estimating the causal effect of the printing press in the production of knowledge in fifteenth-century European cities. 

Cristian is a PhD student and Research Assistant at the City Science group, previously at the Collective Learning group. He holds a bachelor in physics and two master's degrees, one in physics and another in media arts and sciences from the Media Lab. Cristian has participated in a number of academic conferences, corporate board meetings, and policy workshops. 

My research has focused on the geographic diffusion of knowledge.  In particular, I try to understand how regions can leverage the knowledge they have access to, in order to diversify into more productive and more inclusive industries. Recently, I started to focus more on knowledge creation as it relates to innovation and entrepreneurship. In particular, my current research studies the microgeography of innovation.

My past research includes work on uncovering the relationship between the knowledge content of a country's economy and their level of income inequality, as well as work on estimating the causal effect of the printing press in the production of knowledge in fifteenth-century European cities.