Project

Fascia: Biosensing sleep mask for research in wild

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[Fascia is currently under development]

Fascia is a smart sleep mask aimed at facilitating sleep studies in natural settings. The mask records physiological signals including EEG, EOG, EMG, heart rate, head movement, and skin temperature. The fabric-based mask includes a flexible circuit positioned on the face that gathers all the relevant PSG data without disturbing sleep quality. The device integrates the sensors close to the skin, while two printed circuit boards house the components for signal processing and storage farther away from the skin. The prototype is designed to maximize the quantity and quality of sensor signals, as well as ensuring user comfort, so as to produce accurate data and reduce the first night effect typical of clinical sleep studies (Agnew Jr et al., 1966). The prototype can also detect emotional expression via facial EMG, which we previously demonstrated in a related device for collecting physiological data with a VR headset (PhysioHMD). This presents a possibility for recording emotional expressions to a dream avatar, as prior research has demonstrated that frowning and smiling… View full description

[Fascia is currently under development]

Fascia is a smart sleep mask aimed at facilitating sleep studies in natural settings. The mask records physiological signals including EEG, EOG, EMG, heart rate, head movement, and skin temperature. The fabric-based mask includes a flexible circuit positioned on the face that gathers all the relevant PSG data without disturbing sleep quality. The device integrates the sensors close to the skin, while two printed circuit boards house the components for signal processing and storage farther away from the skin. The prototype is designed to maximize the quantity and quality of sensor signals, as well as ensuring user comfort, so as to produce accurate data and reduce the first night effect typical of clinical sleep studies (Agnew Jr et al., 1966). The prototype can also detect emotional expression via facial EMG, which we previously demonstrated in a related device for collecting physiological data with a VR headset (PhysioHMD). This presents a possibility for recording emotional expressions to a dream avatar, as prior research has demonstrated that frowning and smiling muscle tension during sleep corresponds with dreamed emotional content (Rivera-García et al., 2019).